Book Size: 8.5" x 10.75"

Pages: 32

Format: Hardback

ISBN: 9781566560481

Imprint: Crocodile Books

Edition: 1

Illustrations: full-color

Age: 3 to 8

Release date: 07/09/05

Categories: ,

African Orchestra, The

by & Joan Rankin

$ 17.95

“Traditional lutes, drums, rattles, and reed flutes join crackling fires, thundering hooves, and the sounds of the wind in the grass, singing frogs, crickets, birds, and more that make up the natural beauty of The African Orchestra. Gentle rhymes and rhythms by Wendy Hartman build as innovative watercolors from Joan Rankin see the musicians gather as the seasons change and day turns to night, all while the wild and hallowed music of Africa plays on.” – Foreword Reviews

About this book

With magical illustrations from Joan Rankin, and poetry from masterful storyteller, Wendy Hartmann, The African Orchestra lyrically captures the magic of the African sounds of nature.

From the clicking of crickets to the crackle of the fire, follow the journey that celebrates these sounds, in the rhythm and music of Africa.

Brand:

About the author

Wendy Hartmann has been writing for many years, with more than 40 children’s books published, including, most recently, The African Orchestra. Her work ranges from concept and counting, beginner readers, high interest/low vocabulary readers to picture books. Her books have been selected for honor’s lists and nominated for awards for writing and illustration. Wendy lives in Cape Town, is married and has two daughters. In her spare time, she paints and has taken part in numerous exhibitions and has works in private collections in South Africa as well as overseas. Joan Rankin has illustrated over 30 books for children, including the acclaimed The African Orchestra. She received the South African HAUM Daan Retief Prize for Children’s Book Illustration in 1986 and the Katrine Harries Award for Children’s Book Illustration in 1991. Wendy Hartmann is an award-winning South African author of more than forty children’s books. They range from concept and counting, beginner readers, high interest/low vocabulary readers to picture books. Her books have been selected for honor’s lists and nominated for awards for writing and illustration. Wendy lives in Table View, Cape Town. She is married and has two daughters. In her spare time, she paints and has taken part in numerous exhibitions and has works in private collections internationally.

Reviews

“PreS-Gr 2- Nature is music to humans and is celebrated in this lyrical picture book about Africa’s sounds and the instruments used to re-create them. Hartmann produces harmony and rhythm relying on rhyming couplets to introduce native flora and fauna. The prevalence of onomatopoeia helps the verse “snap,” ‘crackle,’ and ‘huummmm,’ making this an attractive selection for storytime. Rankin’s watercolor illustrations envelop each page gently, seamlessly intertwining with and reinforcing the text. On one spread, ‘We are the herds, that gallop and run, We “rumble” and “boo-oom” in the African drum.’ On the left, brown hands thrum on a drum, while galloping hooves of bright and varying hues mimic the same pattern of human arms and sound. One can hear the ‘rumble’ and ‘boo-oom’ replicated in the drummer’s beat. Like Lloyd Moss’s Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin, this is a great examination of onomatopoeia and instrumentation, but pair it with Eric Carle’s I See a Song for a true sensory experience. The only minor drawback is a generalization of Africa inherent in such works. However, it’s worth noting both contributors are native to the continent. VERDICT A beautiful addition to any library serving young children.” – School Library Journal

“In simple and magical verse, Hartmann transports readers to the beautiful landscapes of Africa with a celebration of African music and instruments and the accompanying splendid natural sounds that birthed them. Soft mixed-media illustrations with a strong emphasis on watercolors provide the backdrop for this celebration of African cultural contributions and the natural wonders that offered their inspiration. Hartmann eloquently writes, ‘In the beginning, when all things began, these were the sounds which were music to man, ‘reminding readers of the long history of Africa as the motherland for all human beings. Featured in the onomatopoeic orchestra are the clicking of crickets, the crackle of fire, the ‘cr-i-sshh’ of seedpod rattles, the ‘hummmm’ of honeybees, and the ‘rumble’ and ‘boo-oom’ of the hooved animals of the grassland. Birds, frogs, and zebras are found along with choruses of traditionally dressed African men and women. ‘Through African nights and African days,’ Hartmann emphasizes, ‘THIS is the music that the orchestra plays!’ With its onomatopoeia, it’s a natural for participatory read-alouds, perhaps paired with Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin, by Lloyd Moss and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman (1995), and similar musical outings. A magical tour of the natural wonders of the African continent tied with a celebration of the cultural foundations of African people who mined these sounds to create beautiful music. (Picture book. 5-8)” – Kirkus Reviews

“Traditional lutes, drums, rattles, and reed flutes join crackling fires, thundering hooves, and the sounds of the wind in the grass, singing frogs, crickets, birds, and more that make up the natural beauty of The African Orchestra. Gentle rhymes and rhythms by Wendy Hartman build as innovative watercolors from Joan Rankin see the musicians gather as the seasons change and day turns to night, all while the wild and hallowed music of Africa plays on.” – Foreword Reviews

Additional information

Author

Hartmann, Wendy

Author 2

Rankin, Joan

Edition

1

Inprint

Crocodile Books

Pages

32

Type

HB

Illustrations

full-color

Age

3 to 8

Release date

07/09/05

Author Home

South Africa

Format

8.5 " x 10.75"

Reviews

"PreS-Gr 2- Nature is music to humans and is celebrated in this lyrical picture book about Africa's sounds and the instruments used to re-create them. Hartmann produces harmony and rhythm relying on rhyming couplets to introduce native flora and fauna. The prevalence of onomatopoeia helps the verse "snap,"å 'crackle,' and 'huummmm,' making this an attractive selection for storytime. Rankin's watercolor illustrations envelop each page gently, seamlessly intertwining with and reinforcing the text. On one spread, 'We are the herds, that gallop and run, We "rumble"å and "boo-oom"å in the African drum.' On the left, brown hands thrum on a drum, while galloping hooves of bright and varying hues mimic the same pattern of human arms and sound. One can hear the 'rumble' and 'boo-oom' replicated in the drummer's beat. Like Lloyd Moss's Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin, this is a great examination of onomatopoeia and instrumentation, but pair it with Eric Carle's I See a Song for a true sensory experience. The only minor drawback is a generalization of Africa inherent in such works. However, it's worth noting both contributors are native to the continent. VERDICT A beautiful addition to any library serving young children."å – School Library Journal
"å¢
"In simple and magical verse, Hartmann transports readers to the beautiful landscapes of Africa with a celebration of African music and instruments and the accompanying splendid natural sounds that birthed them. Soft mixed-media illustrations with a strong emphasis on watercolors provide the backdrop for this celebration of African cultural contributions and the natural wonders that offered their inspiration. Hartmann eloquently writes, 'In the beginning, when all things began, these were the sounds which were music to man, 'reminding readers of the long history of Africa as the motherland for all human beings. Featured in the onomatopoeic orchestra are the clicking of crickets, the crackle of fire, the 'cr-i-sshh' of seedpod rattles, the 'hummmm' of honeybees, and the 'rumble' and 'boo-oom' of the hooved animals of the grassland. Birds, frogs, and zebras are found along with choruses of traditionally dressed African men and women. 'Through African nights and African days,' Hartmann emphasizes, 'THIS is the music that the orchestra plays!' With its onomatopoeia, it's a natural for participatory read-alouds, perhaps paired with Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin, by Lloyd Moss and illustrated by Marjorie Priceman (1995), and similar musical outings. A magical tour of the natural wonders of the African continent tied with a celebration of the cultural foundations of African people who mined these sounds to create beautiful music. (Picture book. 5-8)"å – Kirkus Reviews
"å¢
"Traditional lutes, drums, rattles, and reed flutes join crackling fires, thundering hooves, and the sounds of the wind in the grass, singing frogs, crickets, birds, and more that make up the natural beauty of The African Orchestra. Gentle rhymes and rhythms by Wendy Hartman build as innovative watercolors from Joan Rankin see the musicians gather as the seasons change and day turns to night, all while the wild and hallowed music of Africa plays on."å – Foreword Reviews

MainReview

"PreS-Gr 2- Nature is music to humans and is celebrated in this lyrical picture book about Africa's sounds and the instruments used to re-create them. Hartmann produces harmony and rhythm relying on rhyming couplets to introduce native flora and fauna. The prevalence of onomatopoeia helps the verse "snap,"å 'crackle,' and 'huummmm,' making this an attractive selection for storytime. Rankin's watercolor illustrations envelop each page gently, seamlessly intertwining with and reinforcing the text. On one spread, 'We are the herds, that gallop and run, We "rumble"å and "boo-oom"å in the African drum.' On the left, brown hands thrum on a drum, while galloping hooves of bright and varying hues mimic the same pattern of human arms and sound. One can hear the 'rumble' and 'boo-oom' replicated in the drummer's beat. Like Lloyd Moss's Zin! Zin! Zin! A Violin, this is a great examination of onomatopoeia and instrumentation, but pair it with Eric Carle's I See a Song for a true sensory experience. The only minor drawback is a generalization of Africa inherent in such works. However, it's worth noting both contributors are native to the continent. VERDICT A beautiful addition to any library serving young children."å – School Library Journal